Tag Archives: museum

KMAC Museum Reopening June 4, 2016

KMAC Museum announces the reopening date of June 4, 2016, after an extensive 9-month 3 million dollar renovation. There will be a celebratory ribbon cutting held on June 4 to reopen the historical location of 715 West Main Street.

“We invite the community to join us in celebrating a massive accomplishment in the Louisville art scene,” said Aldy Milliken, executive director and chief curator. “This new efficient design will help further KMAC’s presence as a downtown community center that connects people to art.”

The museum, celebrating its 35th anniversary, partnered with Christoff:Finio Architecture to remodel its historic Main Street space to accommodate additional public space with café and art making areas, streamlined exhibition areas and increased capacity for education programming.

15-0812_Exterior Stair View_
Rendering of KMAC from Main Street, Christoff:Finio.

Last year the museum saw 40,000 visitors and an additional 60,000 participants in educational programming. With the new design, KMAC hopes to double the number of visitors in its first year after renovation, with special admissions news coming soon.

This new design will help KMAC grow with downtown development and Museum Row expansion, as well as further KMAC’s commitment as a vital community art center that provides nationally recognized art exhibitions, art programming for 30,000 school-age children as well as artist talks, musical performances and poetry slams.

During the renovation, the museum has remained active through KMAC in the Community, a series of off-site public programming including events and public art exhibitions like ARTLIK Nulu 2016 and 2015 exhibition at the Louisville Free Public Library. This summer, KMAC programming will return to the museum space, including six weeks of summer camps, exhibition-related programs and family activities.

In the fall of 2014, The Future is Being Crafted: KMAC’s Capital Campaign began to raise funds to provide ongoing support of art education programs through endowment and enhance facility space to sustain museum growth. KMAC has received pledges of 3.3 million dollars toward the campaign to date.

As a reflection of successful programming and future exhibition planning, in 2015, KMAC Museum was awarded grants nationally from The Andy Warhol Foundation and Windgate Foundation, and locally from Gheens Foundation, James Graham Brown Foundation and Community Foundation of Southern Indiana.

KMAC Museum memberships will remain in effect and new memberships will continue to be available. New and continuing members will enjoy special discounts and free admission to select programs, performances and lectures.

More information about the museum’s opening schedule and exhibition will be announced in the coming month. Visit KMACmuseum.org for more information.

 

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Docent. Funny Title for a Fun Job

Docents are one of the best assets to museums. They volunteer their time to learn in-depth about exhibitions and then share their learned knowledge with visitors on guided tours. They field questions and comments about art, the process of art,  and who it is making art in order to aide patrons to a better understanding of something that can be intimidating. It’s a stimulating exchange of ideas and insight between guide and guest.

KMAC recently revived the docent program and we welcome Dana Moore and Gretchen Treitz Brown to the team of dedicated museum volunteers. The current exhibition The New Art of the Loom is their second exhibition giving guided tours. They also guide school field trip tours. Docent tours are available every 1st and 3rd Saturday of the month at 3pm. Simply meet at KMAC’s front reception desk. There is no added fee for the guided tour.

We asked Dana and Gretchen to give us a few observations about being a docent and how they came to volunteer at KMAC.

Gretchen Treitz Brown
“As a docent, I provide tours to facilitate a rewarding museum experience.  I love to help the viewer connect with a piece.  I feel privileged to receive the training from KMAC curators and educators. At KMAC, there is a rich and diverse audience; my experience has been with local, national, and international visitors.  My conversations with visitors bring out more and different ways to view things–visitors and docents can interact and learn from each other.  Each time I give a tour, I notice something new.  Something magical happens when a visitor takes the time to contemplate a detail I might point out.  I tend to talk about my favorite pieces, however, it has been so valuable to learn about an unfamiliar artist or process.  Besides the continuous training process, I enjoy the additional reading and studying about each exhibit.  I can answer questions, thus offering a more satisfying experience.  My interactions with a piece are heightened when visitors share their insights, whether students or adults.  Because I have a significant commitment to the visual arts, it has been a joy to attend curator tours, lectures, exhibition openings, orientation, and on-going training.”

Dana Moore
“I first became aware of KMAC when my son was small and he participated in Winter Break workshops and Summer Art Camp.  I have participated in several hands-on workshops and even worked with metal in a session taught by Craig Kaviar.

I’ve always had an interest in art since childhood and love the process that goes into creating an artwork.  My family loves to travel and museums are always on our list of places to visit.

I am a retired Speech Language Pathologist who worked primarily in the public schools.  Volunteering as a Docent will still let me show students the process and creative thought that goes into a work of art.  I like listening to the KMAC staff and always look forward to learning and seeing new exhibits.”

If you’re passionate about art and love to share this excitement with others, consider becoming a KMAC docent. Email Dane at dane@kmacmuseum.org for more details.

A Donor’s Perspective of Chicago EXPO

The recent Donors’ Circle trip to EXPO Chicago was inspiring and stimulating. It was quite extraordinary to get personal home tours from esteemed art collectors, private viewings of new gallery exhibitions, invitation-only after parties and all the contemporary art Chicago’s Navy Pier could handle.

KMAC Donors’ Circle member Leslie Millar wrote a brief synopsis of the week-end in case you couldn’t join us.
The Highlights of EXPO Chicago September 2013 
A group of about fifteen members of the Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft Donor’s Circle ventured north for a fast-paced weekend in the Windy City.  Upon our return, we feel briefly sated with new and familiar works of contemporary art.  This “food” will keep our minds and imaginations energized until our next trip, to Art Basel Miami!  Here are a few morsels from our trip for your delectation:
The Guffman Home
The Guthman Home
The Guffman Home
The Guthman Home
Friday, September 20, 2013
We started the morning by touring the private collection of Jack and Sandy Guthman. Their immaculately restored five-story home includes a canvas thread piece by Tom Friedman, an installation by Sarah Sze, and video by Kate Gilmore.  We admired a FedEx shipping box of Walead Beshty and bundles assembled by Shinique Smith.  The wide-reaching collection revolves around a strong center of photography and some Chicago artists, including painter Judy Ledgerwood. During the afternoon, we toured galleries and met with artists and curators who were buzzing about the EXPO and accompanying Gallery Weekend Chicago. That evening the KMAC group was invited for cocktails at Kavi Gupta for the opening of Roxy Paine’s Apparatus.
Roxy Paine
Roxy Paine
This diorama show offers a radical departure from the sculpture that viewers have come to associate with the artist.  Two room-sized installations replicate, in unvarnished wood, a control room and a fast food counter, right down to the straw dispensers and fry basket. We finished the night with a raucous party at gallerist Monique Meloche’s house.
Saturday, September 21, 2013
The Donor’s Circle dined on a hearty breakfast on the patio at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago.  Downstairs, we enjoyed a photo show from the museum’s collection.  Upstairs, the MCA showcases a retrospective by Chicago-born cartoonist Daniel Clowes.  On the third floor, an exhibition of installations called Homebodies features a walk-through Victorian house fabricated in nylon by Do Ho Suh.  The Donor’s Circle took particular note of constructions and video by Chicago resident Theaster Gates, as we recently exhibited one of Gates’ shoe-shine stands at KMAC during the Storytelling as Craft. Next we visited the private Collection of Howard and Donna Stone, which centers around 60s and 70s Minimalist and Conceptualist work, including:  a double-portrait wall drawing by Jim Hodges, pieces made of yarn and elastic thread by Fred Sandbach, a candy pile by Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and an installation by Sarah Sze. We spent the rest of the afternoon strolling through Chicago EXPO, on the Navy Pier viewing works by established artists like Fred Tomaselli and Leon Ferrari and site specific ampersands by emerging artist Karl Haendel.  Some revelers continued on to Late Night at the Wright Auction House.
Leon Ferrari
Leon Ferrari

Sunday, September 22, 3013
We finished our Chicago weekend with a brunch at Rhona Hoffman Gallery, where we saw Spencer Finch’s color-swatch watercolor paintings and light boxes and took in Judy Ledgerwood’s dense oil paintings.

Many thanks go to the collectors, curators, and gallerists who shared their gracious hospitality.  Even greater thanks to KMAC Director Aldy Milliken and Development Director Angela Hagan for their tireless efforts of organizing the trip and shepherding the members of the Donor’s Circle around the city. We hope that you will join the KMAC Donor’s Circle on another of these intellectually invigorating art outings!

Leslie Millar

Jody Howard, Martha Slaughter and Leslie Millar
Jody Howard, Martha Slaughter and Leslie Millar

Donors Circle Preview of Creative Growth and StudioVisions

KMAC invited the Donor Circle to a special preview of two exhibitions that kick off the 2013 fall season, Creative Growth: Dan Miller and Judith Scott and Studio Visions. The entire show features work by artists with disabilities collected from three national art centers that offer support in exploring self-expression. Creative Growth: Dan Miller and Judith Scott curated by Matthew Higgs (White Columns NYC) brings together two artists who are closely associated with the Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, CA. Studio Visions organized by Aldy Milliken with Krista Gregory (Visionaries + Voices) and Al Gorman (StudioWorks) brings together seven regional artists: Robert Bolubasz, Julie Baldyga, Kathleen Brannigan, Courttney Cooper, Andrew Hostick, Romando Love, and Matthew Torstrick.

A few local exhibiting artists as well as the Director of StudioWorks were on hand to further dialogue about the work and answer questions about studio practice. KMAC Director, Aldy Milliken elaborated on how the show came to exhibit at the Museum. He first saw the work of Judith Scott at NADA Miami and was intrigued. After research, he found other art centers that were enabling the art making process among adults with physical and developmental disabilities including a few right in the region.
The documentary, Outsider: The Life and Art of Judith Scott by Betsy Bayha is also a part of the exhibition.

Natural Wonder

Image: Claire Sherman, Cave and Trees, 2011, oil on canvas, 96″ x 78″

By Mary Wallace

Born in Oberlin, OH, Claire Sherman began painting in high school, studying under a local artist and then went on to attend the Art Institute of Chicago. Recently Sherman has developed a style of landscape painting which employs the use of manipulation and abstraction to create her scenes. Often drawing from composite images of various environmental elements, she distorts the scene, forcing the viewer to make sense of the work. Her paintings push past the limits of the perceivable, natural environment and delve into a world broken down into its elemental forms. Sherman’s settings are often constructed by piecing together images of many different locations, thereby creating her own environment, rooted in reality and yet stepping into another world. Her work has represented not only the different seasons, but also a variety of geological locations. From a snow-laden forest to the dark, rocky interior of caves, to the sparse vegetation of the desert, her subject matter is immensely varied and yet her expressive style unites it all. She examines the basic elements of nature and promotes a sense of the pure wilderness; untouched and untamed by the work of humankind. One piece currently on display during The  7 Borders exhibit unites both the cave environment as well as the summer forest in full bloom. Cave and Trees (pictured above) is rendered from one of the many openings to the worlds longest cave system: Mammoth Cave, located near Bowling Green, Kentucky. Currently Mammoth Cave has been mapped at 346 miles long and has been in use for nearly 4,000 years since its discovery by early Native Americans. Although this cave system offers a vast interior, Sherman has chosen to represent its opening—as if one is coming out of a long journey through the cold underground, into a bright and inviting Kentucky forest.

Kentucky Through the Lens

Image: Guy Mendes, Tobacco Hanging, 1991. Silver gelatin print, 12 x 10 in.

By Stephanie Hamilton, KMAC Intern

Guy Mendes is one of the most well known and respected photographers of the region. He was born in New Orleans, but in 1966 attended the University of Kentucky to study journalism. The following year he attended a rally where Kentucky writer Wendell Berry spoke out against the Vietnam War and the two young artists became friends instantly. This friendship eventually led to Mendes  meeting photographer Ralph Eugene Meatyard.

Meatyard, whose work was featured in our previous exhibit Storytelling as Craft, Chapter One, was an optician and photographer living in Lexington, KY. The eyeglass company he worked for also sold photography equipment leading Meatyard to become a member of The Lexington Camera Club. He shot photos of people wearing masks to skew their individual identities creating bizarre and haunting images. Meatyard’s photographic style sparked Mendes’ interest and he became an unofficial student of Meatyard’s during the 60’s and early 70’s. He  learned mostly by watching him, trying to truly see through Meatyard’s eyes.

Mendes shoots his photographs on black and white film, holding true to traditions of photography. He uses a darkroom to develop his photographs on silver gelatin paper. Mendes’ interest in travel and story-telling, things he often did with his mentor Meatyard, led him to a full-time career as a writer, director and producer for Kentucky Educational Television for 35 years. A career in television meant he didn’t have to rely on his photographs for income, which gave him the freedom to photograph the subject matter that he wanted and without restrictions.

Guy Mendes is famous for his portraits and landscapes, most of which focus on the people and places of Kentucky. Of the eight pieces currently in The 7 Borders exhibit at KMAC, four of them are portraits of Kentucky natives. This is just a small portion of the work Mendes has done in capturing Kentucky history. More can be found in his books 40/40: Forty Years Forty Portraits, which are a collection of portraits taken over the last four decades and Light at Hand, which is the first book collection of portraits and landscapes from 1970 though 1985. Both can be purchased online or in person at the KMAC Museum Shop.

Much of Mendes’ work has been widely published in books and magazines and his prints are in many public and private collections. Mendes has also won several Emmy Awards as a documentary writer, director and producer for Kentucky Educational Television. He lives in Lexington, KY with his wife and two sons.

Bradley Pickelsheimer with Princess 1984 600

Bradley Harrison Picklesimer, with Princess
Lexington, KY
Silver Gelatin Print, 1986

Bradley Harrison Picklesimer was born in Lexington. Here he is pictured with the eldest of his three pit bulls, Princess. His dogs were very important to him, and very sweet. He began decorating parties at the age of 14, and later went on to decorate parties for Kentucky Educational Television, where Guy Mendes worked. Picklesimer also started several night clubs in Lexington, including Cafe LMNOP, where he said anyone could feel at home. He felt he was doing a public service, bring people together from all walks of life. Mendes says of Picklesimer in the book 40/40: “Bradley was always a real man’s kind of drag queen: he didn’t do fake tits and he didn’t have a stage name, but he sure cut a striking figure carrying in a keg of beer wearing six-inch heels.”

Guy Mendes, JonathanWilliams

Jonathan Williams
Shakertown, Pleasant Hill, KY
Silver Gelatin Print, 1988

 Jonathan Williams and Guy Mendes were very close friends, writing letters to one another and traveling together along with Williams’ partner, Tom Meyer. Although Williams lived in North Carolina and England, he was anointed Kentucky Colonel in 1974 for service to the arts. Williams came to Kentucky in search of his contemporaries, including Gene Meatyard and Wendell Berry. Mendes says “Jonathan was the straw that stirred the drink.” Willaims was a poet, publisher, essayist, and photographer. He, along with David Ruff, founded the Jargon Society in 1951, wanting to publish obscure poets. His poetry uses “found language”. He spent much of his time listening to people and gathering their words, much in the same way avant-garde filmmakers use “found footage.” Williams died of pneumonia in 2008. He is survived by his partner of 40 years, Tom Meyer.

Guy Mendes, Martha Nelson Thomas

 Martha Nelson Thomas with her Doll Babies
Louisville, KY
Silver Gelatin Print, 1987

 Martha Nelson Thomas created her Doll Babies as a source of income so she could concentrate on her paintings. Each Doll Baby was unique, and came with adoption papers and an introductory letter. At the Guild Gallery in Lexington, the parents had family reunions. There was even a waiting list for those wanting to adopt. In 1978, a man in Georgia that had inflated the price on Martha’s Doll Babies, causing her to take back her dolls, claimed to have invented his own kind of doll.

In a letter he wrote to Nelson Thomas he said “If I can’t sell your dolls, I’ll sell some just like them.” He then created the popular Cabbage Patch Kids. She took the man to court, and after five years, she won a settlement and tightened copyright laws for artists in doing so. This photograph Mendes took of her could now serve as proof of copyright, whereas before, she was denied copyright because she hadn’t signed her dolls. Martha responded, “I wanted them to be as real as possible, and there’s no place to sign a baby.” Martha spent much of her life working with children in workshops and schools. She died in May of this year at the age of 62.

Guy Mendes, Captain Kentucky

Captain Kentucky, a.k.a. Ed McClanahan
Lexington, KY
Silver Gelatin Print, 1972

Ed McClanahan, also known as Captain Kentucky, is a novelist, essayist, and professor at University of Kentucky in Lexington. He is best known for his novel The Natural Man, but is also famous for the people he surrounded himself with in the ’60s and ’70s. He was part of Ken Kesey’s “merry pranksters.” The group took trips around the country in the 1960s in a painted bus, while Tom Wolfe documented their experiences with psychedelic drugs.

Mendes has taken many photos of Ed McClanahan throughout the years. This photograph in particular is now the cover of McClanahan’s latest book, I Just Hitched in From The Coast.

Quilted Matter

Image above: Denise Burge, Roan Mountain Matrix, 2001. Fabric, thread, 70″ x 84″ Courtesy of the artist

By Mary Wallace

Denise Burge constructs layers of intricate fabrics and felts, explosions of color, lines, and words into quilts that fluidly combine two worlds into one; the graphic nature of the urban city—influenced by her residence in Cincinnati, OH—and the traditional pastime of the American country where she grew up. She utilizes the fabrics to create sprawling, sometimes jumbled images that consume the attention of their viewers and draw them into the work.

Burge, Maquette, 2002
Detailed view: Denise Burge, Maquette, 2002. Fabric, thread, 68″ x 98″

Childhood memories, along with her love of nature and the Appalachian Mountains, inspired Burge to create these quilts, which tell stories through image as well as written word. Thinking of her work as a metaphor for the landscape, she “sees nature as a powerful being and [she] sees quilts as a geological structure.” Just as the American landscape is pieced together with various geological elements, her quilts are a collage of fabrics merged into one cohesive structure.

Roan Mountain Matrix (featured image) exemplifies her connection with the terrain of the Appalachian Mountains which run through Kentucky and several of its Eastern Border States. Roan Mountain is one of the highest summits in the Appalachian Mountain range and is located on the Tennessee/North Carolina state line. It also holds one of the largest iron ore deposits. Burge has been affected by the changing landscape due to Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining, a form of mining practice where the tops of mountains are removed, exposing the seams of coal. Read more about Mountaintop Removal HERE. She has said, “I’ve noticed how the land existed around the highway, changed by mountaintop removal.  I was fascinated by the theater of the land and how we use the land; how the land fights back at what we do to it….fascinated by the theater of how we experience nature.” Roan Mountain Matrix is indicative of the area in which The 7 Borders exhibit encompasses.

When viewing the piece, the eye fixates on the invitingly colorful entrance to the interior of the dark patch-worked mountain. Bright colored yarn creates a cross section of elliptical layers representative of the earth’s structuring layers. The various fabrics, threads and words come together to create a commentary about the fate of this mountain and the want of the matrix it carries.

Denise Burge is an accomplished artist in many mediums, including recent work in photography and film, and has shown in galleries and museums all over the country. She attained both a BFA and MFA in Painting and Printmaking. Though born in North Carolina, she currently resides in Cincinnati, OH and is an Associate Professor and MFA Program Director at the University of Cincinnati.